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Previous Colorado Attorneys General

Fred Farrar

Fred Farrar

Term: 1913-1916

               Benjamin Griffith ran for reelection in 1912, but on the Progressive (Bull Moose) ticket, rather than as a Republican. He lost to Democrat Fred Farrar in a five way race that included Republican William Gobin.

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Benjamin Griffith

Benjamin Griffith

Term: 1911-1912

               By 1910 the population of Colorado had reached 800,000 and the state had become increasingly urbanized. But there were still 46,000 farms in the state and a great deal of mining activity. In the election of 1920 Democrat Governor John Shafroth was reelected but a Republican lawyer from Grand Junction, Benjamin Griffith, was elected Attorney General.

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John T. Barnett

John T. Barnett

Term: 1909-1910

               At the beginning of 1908 the new Denver Municipal Auditorium, with a capacity of 12,500, was completed in time to host the 1908 Democratic National Convention. And in the general election of 1908, Democrats won back both the Governorship and the Attorney General’s Office. John F. Shafroth was elected Governor and John T. Barnett was elected Attorney General. Barnett defeated Republican George Hodges and two other candidates.

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William H. Dickson

William H. Dickson

Term: 1907-1908

               In the general election of 1906, Republican William Dickson defeated Democrat William B. Morgan and two minor party candidates to become Attorney General. Upon taking office, his three Assistant Attorneys General were Horace Phelps, George D. Talbot and S. H. Thompson, Jr. It’s unclear whether one of them served as the Deputy Attorney General.

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Nathan C. Miller

Nathan C. Miller

Term: 1903-1906

               In 1902, Colorado voters amended the state’s constitution to allow any town of over 2,000 people to become a “home rule” city. Denver was the first to do so. The winner of the 1902 Attorney General’s race was Nathan C. Miller of Durango. Miller, a Republican, defeated Democrat John C. Schweigert and four minor party candidates, including Charles Post. His salary as Attorney General was $3,000 per year. Miller had three Assistants, Henry Hersey, I. B. Melville and a Mr. Waldron.

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Charles C. Post

Charles C. Post

Term: 1901-1902

               By 1900 there were 540,000 people in Colorado. Most of the economic action had shifted from the silver mines of Leadville to the gold fields around Cripple Creek. In 1900 alone, production in the Cripple Creek – Victor mining district reached $20 million and over 80,000 people lived in the District.

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David M. Campbell

David M. Campbell

Term: 1899-1900

               In the general election of 1898, David M. Campbell was elected Attorney General. Campbell had not sought the office initially, but was nominated by a friend from Pueblo, Governor Thomas Alderman, at the Democratic State Convention. Campbell ran on a fusion ticket of Democrats and Populists and campaigned hard for the victory.

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Byron L. Carr

Byron L. Carr

Term: 1895-1898

               In the general election of 1894, Republican Byron Leander Carr was elected Attorney General by a margin of 90,262 to 73,006 over his nearest rival, H. T. Sales. Service as Attorney General was the pinnacle of an illustrious career for Carr.

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Eugene Engley

Eugene Engley

Term: 1893-1894

               Not only did the Populist Party win the Colorado Governorship in 1892, they also won the Attorney General’s Office. Populist candidate Eugene Engley defeated Republican Charles Libby by a vote of 41,943 to 38,180. In fact, Engley was the nominee of four political parties.

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Joseph H. Maupin

Joseph H. Maupin

Term: 1891-1892

               The first seven Attorneys General of Colorado were Republicans. It was not until the election of 1890 that the first Democrat, Joseph H. Maupin, was elected. He defeated incumbent Samuel Jones by 1,000 votes. Maupin was born in Columbia, Missouri on April 13, 1856. He was one of six children. His father fought for the Confederacy and died during the Civil War. Joseph Maupin worked at various jobs to put himself through the law department at the University of Missouri. After graduating with honors in 1878 he moved to Colorado and opened a law office in Huerfano County.

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